Gay marriage: Suburb of Blaxland not celebrating result

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  • Same-sex marriage has been legalised in Australia after a vote by Parliament
  • Postal survey results last month revealed Australians were in favour of issue
  • However, 12 electorates from western Sydney returned a majority no vote
  • Blaxland returned strong majority of 73.9 per cent of residents voting no 

Hannah Moore For Daily Mail Australia

Last month, a non-binding and voluntary postal survey revealed Australians were overwhelmingly in favour of same-sex couples being granted the right to marry.

But 12 electorates from western Sydney returned a majority no vote.

Hours before Parliament voted to enact the change into law on Thursday to allow same-sex couples the same recognition of their relationships that straight couples have, residents in the seat of Blaxland, which returned a No result with a 73.9 per cent majority, were in two minds.

Azzam, 21, and his friend Ayman, 23, were sitting at a juice bar ahead of the vote, looking disgruntled.

‘It’s not appropriate,’ Ayman told Daily Mail Australia.

‘We can’t teach our kids and raise them like that – [the future] is going to be ugly. I’ll probably raise my kids overseas, in the Middle East.’

Hours before Parliament voted to enact the change into law, allowing same sex couples, the same recognition of their relationships that straight couples are afforded the seat of Blaxland, which returned a No result with a 73.9 per cent majority, were in two minds

Hours before Parliament voted to enact the change into law, allowing same sex couples, the same recognition of their relationships that straight couples are afforded the seat of Blaxland, which returned a No result with a 73.9 per cent majority, were in two minds

Hours before Parliament voted to enact the change into law, allowing same sex couples, the same recognition of their relationships that straight couples are afforded the seat of Blaxland, which returned a No result with a 73.9 per cent majority, were in two minds

Azzam (left) and his friend Ayman (right) were sitting at a juice bar ahead of the vote, looking disgruntled. 'It's not appropriate. I'll probably raise my kids overseas, in the Middle East.'

Azzam (left) and his friend Ayman (right) were sitting at a juice bar ahead of the vote, looking disgruntled. 'It's not appropriate. I'll probably raise my kids overseas, in the Middle East.'

Azzam (left) and his friend Ayman (right) were sitting at a juice bar ahead of the vote, looking disgruntled. ‘It’s not appropriate. I’ll probably raise my kids overseas, in the Middle East.’

Mozza (right), 46, was laughing on the street with her friend Lamtech (centre), 30, as the historical vote approached

Mozza (right), 46, was laughing on the street with her friend Lamtech (centre), 30, as the historical vote approached

Mozza (right), 46, was laughing on the street with her friend Lamtech (centre), 30, as the historical vote approached

Despite his strong views, Ayman did not participate in the postal survey, as he believed his vote ‘wasn’t going to do anything’.

George, a local 28-year-old who explained he was a ‘devout Catholic’, used the bible to explain his stance against same sex marriage.

‘Lucifer was the first person to [want] equality,’ he explained. ‘He was God’s favourite angel – look how that turned out for him.’

He says he has nothing against gay people though: ‘Hate the sin, not the sinner, you know?’

Shop-owner Fayis, 35, told Daily Mail Australia he didn’t personally support same-sex marriage, but he accepted the result of the postal survey.

‘This is not right,’ he said.

‘But if it is law, we follow the law.

‘The people have spoken, who am I to judge? If you ask me if it is good, I say no, for myself.’

Shop-owner Fayis, 35, told Daily Mail Australia he didn't personally support same-sex marriage, but he accepted the result of the postal survey. 'This is not right,' he said

Shop-owner Fayis, 35, told Daily Mail Australia he didn't personally support same-sex marriage, but he accepted the result of the postal survey. 'This is not right,' he said

Shop-owner Fayis, 35, told Daily Mail Australia he didn’t personally support same-sex marriage, but he accepted the result of the postal survey. ‘This is not right,’ he said

While the men in the seat of Blaxland were quite outspoken in their views against same-sex marriage, the women were decidedly more open to the idea

While the men in the seat of Blaxland were quite outspoken in their views against same-sex marriage, the women were decidedly more open to the idea

While the men in the seat of Blaxland were quite outspoken in their views against same-sex marriage, the women were decidedly more open to the idea

While the men in the seat of Blaxland were quite outspoken in their views against same-sex marriage, the women were decidedly more open to the idea

While the men in the seat of Blaxland were quite outspoken in their views against same-sex marriage, the women were decidedly more open to the idea

While the men in the seat of Blaxland were quite outspoken in their views against same-sex marriage, the women were decidedly more open to the idea.

A woman named Sahara was walking through the local shopping precinct wearing a purple, yellow and white hijab.

‘I’m not going to judge anyone,’ she said.

‘Everyone gets a choice. I choose to cover myself [with the hijab], they can choose what they like.

‘We’ve just got to support them.’

Sylva, 19, who was sitting with her mother outside a takeaway shop, told Daily Mail she had ‘no problem’ with Parliament’s end decision.

‘This is their year,’ she said.

‘This is part of their life. We can’t change people in religion or marriage, everyone has the right to do what they want.’

Despite his strong views, Ayman did not participate in the postal survey, as he believed his vote 'wasn't going to do anything'

Despite his strong views, Ayman did not participate in the postal survey, as he believed his vote 'wasn't going to do anything'

Despite his strong views, Ayman did not participate in the postal survey, as he believed his vote 'wasn't going to do anything'

Despite his strong views, Ayman did not participate in the postal survey, as he believed his vote 'wasn't going to do anything'

Despite his strong views, Ayman did not participate in the postal survey, as he believed his vote ‘wasn’t going to do anything’

New Zealand citizen John, 52, said he didn’t vote for obvious reasons, but would have voted yes.

He said his one gripe with the process was that local MP Jason Clare would be voting yes, against his electorate’s clear choice.

‘It’s not representing his constituency – but I guess he’s just going along party lines,’ he said.

Mozza, 46, was laughing on the street with her friend Lamtech, 30, as the historical vote approached.

‘I’m cool with it,’ she said. ‘Each to their own – it doesn’t affect me.’

Lamtech said he was also happy with the upcoming change in the law.

‘We stand for the people, It’s all good,’ he said.

Mai, who was eating lunch nearby, said: ‘I’m nearly 66 years old and have never been married – if they can do it, go for it’.

Mai, who was eating lunch nearby, said: 'I'm nearly 66 years old and have never been married – if they can do it, go for it'

Mai, who was eating lunch nearby, said: 'I'm nearly 66 years old and have never been married – if they can do it, go for it'

Mai, who was eating lunch nearby, said: ‘I’m nearly 66 years old and have never been married – if they can do it, go for it’

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